EASTERN PIPISTRELLE

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CLASSIFICATION:

FAMILY: Vespertilionidae

GENUS: Pipistrellus

SPECIES: subflavus

PRONUNCIATION: pip-a-strell-lus sub-flave-us

DESCRIPTION:

Fur is yellowish or grayish brown. The hair has a dark gray base, broad yellowish brown sub terminal band, and dark brown tip. The basal 1/3 of the uropatagium is sparsely furred. Wingspan is 8-10″.

DIET:

Insects – This bat is often found foraging over waterways and water edges for its meals.

NORTH AMERICAN RANGE & HABITAT:

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The eastern pipistrelle hibernates in more caves of eastern North America than any other bat, typically choosing roosting locations where moisture condenses on its fur, giving it the appearance of a frosted Christmas ornament. Mines and rock cre4vices are also used for hibernation sites in winter, and occasionally as night roosts in summer.

Because pipistrelles are quite susceptible to freezing, they are among the first bats to begin hibernation in the fall and last to leave in spring. In summer, adults of both sexes inhabit watercourses bordered by deciduous woods and usually roost in trees. Females establish nursery colonies in a variety of these sites.

Despite being one of the most widespread and abundant bats of eastern North America, relatively little is known about the eastern pipistrelle.

MISCELLANEOUS:

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Eastern pipistrelles are weak fliers and are so small that they may be mistake for a moth. Usually bear 1-2 young in early summer. Babies are born hairless and pink with eyes closed, and they are capable of making clicking sounds that aid their mothers in locating them. Newborns grow rapidly and can fly within a month.